arkitekcher:

The Garden of Albertopolis / Experiment Road  |  Shaan PatelAA - Architectural Association 2014: Intermediate 13
“Pataphysics is used to comment on a rational way of thinking through humor by an absurd use of the same rationality applied to something unusual or strange. In a similar way The Garden of Albertopolis or Experiment Road is an institution formed on the model of a series of five experiments done on different kinds of plants to reveal their consciousness. The Garden sets up scenarios that allow these strange plants to exhibit and exercise these qualities. The design for the five “experiments” are based on five theories of plant life that have been extensively researched but never been proven. The five gardens form an institution enclosed by a colonnade that is the main infrastructural piece. It acts as a theatre where the paths around the gardens at different levels are the places to view these strange worlds of plants. These worlds are the stages that have been sunken into the ground that further mystifies the activities of the gardens to the observer. This takes the model of a typical botanical garden critically subverts it to reflect the re-categorization of plants based on their emotional qualities. From plants that control a green house to plants that predict the weather, Experiment Road is this mythical institution suggesting an alternative way of exhibiting plant life.

arkitekcher:

The Garden of Albertopolis / Experiment Road  |  Shaan PatelAA - Architectural Association 2014: Intermediate 13
“Pataphysics is used to comment on a rational way of thinking through humor by an absurd use of the same rationality applied to something unusual or strange. In a similar way The Garden of Albertopolis or Experiment Road is an institution formed on the model of a series of five experiments done on different kinds of plants to reveal their consciousness. The Garden sets up scenarios that allow these strange plants to exhibit and exercise these qualities. The design for the five “experiments” are based on five theories of plant life that have been extensively researched but never been proven. The five gardens form an institution enclosed by a colonnade that is the main infrastructural piece. It acts as a theatre where the paths around the gardens at different levels are the places to view these strange worlds of plants. These worlds are the stages that have been sunken into the ground that further mystifies the activities of the gardens to the observer. This takes the model of a typical botanical garden critically subverts it to reflect the re-categorization of plants based on their emotional qualities. From plants that control a green house to plants that predict the weather, Experiment Road is this mythical institution suggesting an alternative way of exhibiting plant life.

arkitekcher:

The Garden of Albertopolis / Experiment Road  |  Shaan PatelAA - Architectural Association 2014: Intermediate 13
“Pataphysics is used to comment on a rational way of thinking through humor by an absurd use of the same rationality applied to something unusual or strange. In a similar way The Garden of Albertopolis or Experiment Road is an institution formed on the model of a series of five experiments done on different kinds of plants to reveal their consciousness. The Garden sets up scenarios that allow these strange plants to exhibit and exercise these qualities. The design for the five “experiments” are based on five theories of plant life that have been extensively researched but never been proven. The five gardens form an institution enclosed by a colonnade that is the main infrastructural piece. It acts as a theatre where the paths around the gardens at different levels are the places to view these strange worlds of plants. These worlds are the stages that have been sunken into the ground that further mystifies the activities of the gardens to the observer. This takes the model of a typical botanical garden critically subverts it to reflect the re-categorization of plants based on their emotional qualities. From plants that control a green house to plants that predict the weather, Experiment Road is this mythical institution suggesting an alternative way of exhibiting plant life.

arkitekcher:

The Garden of Albertopolis / Experiment Road  |  Shaan Patel
AA - Architectural Association 2014: Intermediate 13

Pataphysics is used to comment on a rational way of thinking through humor by an absurd use of the same rationality applied to something unusual or strange. In a similar way The Garden of Albertopolis or Experiment Road is an institution formed on the model of a series of five experiments done on different kinds of plants to reveal their consciousness. The Garden sets up scenarios that allow these strange plants to exhibit and exercise these qualities. The design for the five “experiments” are based on five theories of plant life that have been extensively researched but never been proven. The five gardens form an institution enclosed by a colonnade that is the main infrastructural piece. It acts as a theatre where the paths around the gardens at different levels are the places to view these strange worlds of plants. These worlds are the stages that have been sunken into the ground that further mystifies the activities of the gardens to the observer. This takes the model of a typical botanical garden critically subverts it to reflect the re-categorization of plants based on their emotional qualities. From plants that control a green house to plants that predict the weather, Experiment Road is this mythical institution suggesting an alternative way of exhibiting plant life.

(via afotw)

188 notes

found—images:

found—images:

ZTH

found—images:

found—images:

ZTH

9 notes

S Boreham for Robin Sutherland Architecture 

S Boreham for Robin Sutherland Architecture 

18 notes architecture landscape architecture drawing

redhousecanada:

subtilitas:
Column types in Alvar Aalto's Villa Mairea in Noormarkku 1939.
273: Single steel, painted black (living room).
274: Single cast concrete, vertical scoring (library).
275: Single steel, painted black, faced with pine slats (music room).
276: Double steel, painted black, bound in rattan to wainscot height (living room).
277: Double steel, painted black, bound in rattan (music room).
278: Triple steel, painted black, faced with pine slats (dining room).
279: Single steel, painted white (guest bedroom).
280: Single steel, painted black, faced with pine slats (master bedroom).
Via Siren Fay.

redhousecanada:

subtilitas:

Column types in Alvar Aalto's Villa Mairea in Noormarkku 1939.

273: Single steel, painted black (living room).

274: Single cast concrete, vertical scoring (library).

275: Single steel, painted black, faced with pine slats (music room).

276: Double steel, painted black, bound in rattan to wainscot height (living room).

277: Double steel, painted black, bound in rattan (music room).

278: Triple steel, painted black, faced with pine slats (dining room).

279: Single steel, painted white (guest bedroom).

280: Single steel, painted black, faced with pine slats (master bedroom).

Via Siren Fay.

(via archoftheworld)

288 notes


J.A. Brinkman and L.C. van der Vlugt, Four Interior design Plans/Presentation Drawings for the Sonneveld House, (1929-1933)
 Brinkman and Van der Vlugt developed the house’s architecture, interior and decor as a total concept, working closely with their clients. Rooms for residents and staff were kept strictly separate. The architects chose the house’s colors and designed its facilities in consultation with the family. They were also involved in furnishing the interior down to the details. The reason they were able to devote so much time and attention to the design was that the country was in the grip of an economic malaise. After the 1929 stock market crash, no big commissions were forthcoming.
The house’s interior is characterized by warm, clear hues – vermilion, cornflower blue and egg-yolk yellow – in combination with light and dark grey and brown. For the soft furnishings, the architects used a color range selected by the designer Bart van der Leck. In the living room and library, a yellow office chair and orange-red armchairs create accents against the neutral background of bronze, brown and beige. In the bedrooms and dining room, the reverse is true. Here, bright colors are applied to the large surfaces – red cabinets, blue curtains, yellow on the floor – while the table and chairs are in the neutral shades of natural wood, black, gray and chrome.
 (plates from top)
 1)  Interior design for one of the bathrooms
 2)  Interior design for the kitchen
 3)  Interior design for the hall
 4)  Interior design for the daughter’s bedroom


J.A. Brinkman and L.C. van der Vlugt, Four Interior design Plans/Presentation Drawings for the Sonneveld House, (1929-1933)
 Brinkman and Van der Vlugt developed the house’s architecture, interior and decor as a total concept, working closely with their clients. Rooms for residents and staff were kept strictly separate. The architects chose the house’s colors and designed its facilities in consultation with the family. They were also involved in furnishing the interior down to the details. The reason they were able to devote so much time and attention to the design was that the country was in the grip of an economic malaise. After the 1929 stock market crash, no big commissions were forthcoming.
The house’s interior is characterized by warm, clear hues – vermilion, cornflower blue and egg-yolk yellow – in combination with light and dark grey and brown. For the soft furnishings, the architects used a color range selected by the designer Bart van der Leck. In the living room and library, a yellow office chair and orange-red armchairs create accents against the neutral background of bronze, brown and beige. In the bedrooms and dining room, the reverse is true. Here, bright colors are applied to the large surfaces – red cabinets, blue curtains, yellow on the floor – while the table and chairs are in the neutral shades of natural wood, black, gray and chrome.
 (plates from top)
 1)  Interior design for one of the bathrooms
 2)  Interior design for the kitchen
 3)  Interior design for the hall
 4)  Interior design for the daughter’s bedroom


J.A. Brinkman and L.C. van der Vlugt, Four Interior design Plans/Presentation Drawings for the Sonneveld House, (1929-1933)
 Brinkman and Van der Vlugt developed the house’s architecture, interior and decor as a total concept, working closely with their clients. Rooms for residents and staff were kept strictly separate. The architects chose the house’s colors and designed its facilities in consultation with the family. They were also involved in furnishing the interior down to the details. The reason they were able to devote so much time and attention to the design was that the country was in the grip of an economic malaise. After the 1929 stock market crash, no big commissions were forthcoming.
The house’s interior is characterized by warm, clear hues – vermilion, cornflower blue and egg-yolk yellow – in combination with light and dark grey and brown. For the soft furnishings, the architects used a color range selected by the designer Bart van der Leck. In the living room and library, a yellow office chair and orange-red armchairs create accents against the neutral background of bronze, brown and beige. In the bedrooms and dining room, the reverse is true. Here, bright colors are applied to the large surfaces – red cabinets, blue curtains, yellow on the floor – while the table and chairs are in the neutral shades of natural wood, black, gray and chrome.
 (plates from top)
 1)  Interior design for one of the bathrooms
 2)  Interior design for the kitchen
 3)  Interior design for the hall
 4)  Interior design for the daughter’s bedroom


J.A. Brinkman and L.C. van der Vlugt, Four Interior design Plans/Presentation Drawings for the Sonneveld House, (1929-1933)
 Brinkman and Van der Vlugt developed the house’s architecture, interior and decor as a total concept, working closely with their clients. Rooms for residents and staff were kept strictly separate. The architects chose the house’s colors and designed its facilities in consultation with the family. They were also involved in furnishing the interior down to the details. The reason they were able to devote so much time and attention to the design was that the country was in the grip of an economic malaise. After the 1929 stock market crash, no big commissions were forthcoming.
The house’s interior is characterized by warm, clear hues – vermilion, cornflower blue and egg-yolk yellow – in combination with light and dark grey and brown. For the soft furnishings, the architects used a color range selected by the designer Bart van der Leck. In the living room and library, a yellow office chair and orange-red armchairs create accents against the neutral background of bronze, brown and beige. In the bedrooms and dining room, the reverse is true. Here, bright colors are applied to the large surfaces – red cabinets, blue curtains, yellow on the floor – while the table and chairs are in the neutral shades of natural wood, black, gray and chrome.
 (plates from top)
 1)  Interior design for one of the bathrooms
 2)  Interior design for the kitchen
 3)  Interior design for the hall
 4)  Interior design for the daughter’s bedroom

J.A. Brinkman and L.C. van der Vlugt, Four Interior design Plans/Presentation Drawings for the Sonneveld House, (1929-1933)

 Brinkman and Van der Vlugt developed the house’s architecture, interior and decor as a total concept, working closely with their clients. Rooms for residents and staff were kept strictly separate. The architects chose the house’s colors and designed its facilities in consultation with the family. They were also involved in furnishing the interior down to the details. The reason they were able to devote so much time and attention to the design was that the country was in the grip of an economic malaise. After the 1929 stock market crash, no big commissions were forthcoming.

The house’s interior is characterized by warm, clear hues – vermilion, cornflower blue and egg-yolk yellow – in combination with light and dark grey and brown. For the soft furnishings, the architects used a color range selected by the designer Bart van der Leck. In the living room and library, a yellow office chair and orange-red armchairs create accents against the neutral background of bronze, brown and beige. In the bedrooms and dining room, the reverse is true. Here, bright colors are applied to the large surfaces – red cabinets, blue curtains, yellow on the floor – while the table and chairs are in the neutral shades of natural wood, black, gray and chrome.

 (plates from top)

 1)  Interior design for one of the bathrooms

 2)  Interior design for the kitchen

 3)  Interior design for the hall

 4)  Interior design for the daughter’s bedroom

(Source: rudygodinez, via archoftheworld)

269 notes

mentaltimetraveller:

Peter Doig

mentaltimetraveller:

Peter Doig

228 notes

nycartscene:

Happy birthday to Paul Gauguin, born today in 1848.pictured: Gauguin’s “The Seed of the Areoi” (1892)via MoMA’s Permanent Collection

nycartscene:

Happy birthday to Paul Gauguin, born today in 1848.

pictured: Gauguin’s “The Seed of the Areoi” (1892)
via MoMA’s Permanent Collection

413 notes

3wings:

Beach at Le Pouldu - 1889
Paul Gauguin

3wings:

Beach at Le Pouldu - 1889

Paul Gauguin

389 notes

apriati:

David Hockney - A Bigger Splash, 1967 (detail)

apriati:

David Hockney - A Bigger Splash, 1967 (detail)

572 notes

opusmetrico:

Sp10, Galata, Genova, 2010

opusmetrico:

Sp10, Galata, Genova, 2010

9 notes

subtilitas:

Beniamino Servino - Shadow tower (addition to a carpenter’s house), San Marco Evangelista 2011 (click for big to see the tiling details). 

subtilitas:

Beniamino Servino - Shadow tower (addition to a carpenter’s house), San Marco Evangelista 2011 (click for big to see the tiling details). 

(via therulesarethereaintnorules)

377 notes

Maggie’s Centre in Merseyside by Carmody Groarke 

Maggie’s Centre in Merseyside by Carmody Groarke 

Maggie’s Centre in Merseyside by Carmody Groarke 

Maggie’s Centre in Merseyside by Carmody Groarke 

Maggie’s Centre in Merseyside by Carmody Groarke 

1 note carmody groarke maggies centre architecture

Ryan W Kennihan Architects, Leaning Vault House 

Ryan W Kennihan Architects, Leaning Vault House 

8 notes ryan w kennihan architecture

Vilhelm Hammershøi

Vilhelm Hammershøi

Vilhelm Hammershøi

Vilhelm Hammershøi

Vilhelm Hammershøi

Vilhelm Hammershøi

Vilhelm Hammershøi

Vilhelm Hammershøi

11 notes Vilhelm Hammershøi

Ryan W Kennihan Architects, Clifden House 

Ryan W Kennihan Architects, Clifden House 

Ryan W Kennihan Architects, Clifden House 

122 notes Architecture architecture drawing